Rudolph and Frosty Help the Elf

http://www.kittyandsanta.com Elf Kara receives help from Rudolph (the red-nosed reindeer) and Frosty (the snowman) transforming tears and fears into smiles for photos with Kitty and Santa at the Bass Pro Shop in Tallahassee, Florida.

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New Classic Christmas Story

Kitty and Santa’s Stories

Kitty and Santa’s Stories

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The Santa Stories.By Derek Buckham

eBook (PDF): $1.01
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A Wonderful Christmas Story Book of Santa telling 18 stories from Santa’s Village (Black and White, Colour Cover). Ho, ho, ho! Hello children and welcome to the world of Santa and all of his magical… More >

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Santa’s Christmas StoriesBy Derek Buckham

eBook (PDF): $4.69
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Let these short Christmas stories, with the simplicity and purity of freshly fallen snow, transport you to a place of magic and joy. Think of the sweetness of cinnamon and candy canes, bright sparkly…More >

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The Santa Stories B&WBy Derek Buckham

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The True Stories of The Real Santa Clause.(In Black and White)- Ho, ho, ho! Hello children and welcome to the world of Santa and all of his magical helpers. I bet you have all heard of Santa Clause,…More >

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Santa’s Christmas Story BookBy Derek Buckham

eBook (PDF): $5.36
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Let these short Christmas stories, with the simplicity and purity of freshly fallen snow, transport you to a place of magic and joy. Think of the sweetness of cinnamon and candy canes, bright sparkly…More >

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The Santa StoriesBy Derek Buckham

eBook (PDF): $1.01
Download immediately.
     (1 Ratings)
18 True Stories of The Real Santa Clause.(In Colour)- Ho, ho, ho! Hello children and welcome to the world of Santa and all of his magical helpers. I bet you have all heard of Santa Clause, in fact I… More >

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It’s a Wonderful Life on 34th StreetBy Derek Buckham

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“THE GREATEST GIFT A MAN CAN RECEIVE IS A FAMILY. THIS GIFT WAS ABOUT TO BE THROWN AWAY, UNTIL A LETTER SENT UP A CHIMNEY CREATED A MIRACLE WITHIN THE CITY” The script can only be… More >

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The Santa StoriesBy Derek Buckham

eBook (PDF): $1.01
Download immediately.
    
A Wonderful Christmas Story Book of Santa telling 18 stories from Santa’s Village. Ho, ho, ho! Hello children and welcome to the world of Santa and all of his magical helpers. I bet you have all… More >

Add to Cart

Santa’s Christmas Story BookBy Derek Buckham

Paperback: $50.56
Ships in 3-5 business days
    
Let these short Christmas stories, with the simplicity and purity of freshly fallen snow, transport you to a place of magic and joy. Think of the sweetness of cinnamon and candy canes, bright sparkly…More >

Add to Cart

 

Santa’s Christmas StoriesBy Derek Buckham

Paperback: $11.88
Ships in 3-5 business days
    
Let these short Christmas stories, with the simplicity and purity of freshly fallen snow, transport you to a place of magic and joy. Think of the sweetness of cinnamon and candy canes, bright sparkly…More >

Add to Cart

It’s a Wonderful Life on 34th StreetBy Derek Buckham

Paperback: $6.18
Ships in 3-5 business days
     (1 Ratings)
“THE GREATEST GIFT A MAN CAN RECEIVE IS A FAMILY. THIS GIFT WAS ABOUT TO BE THROWN AWAY, UNTIL A LETTER SENT UP A CHIMNEY CREATED A MIRACLE WITHIN THE CITY” The script can only be… More >

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Living Christmas Tree at Christmas

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http://www.kittyandsanta.com A Christmas tree is a decorated tree, usually an evergreen conifer such as spruce, or pine or fir, traditionally associated with the celebration of Christmas. An artificial Christmas tree is an object made to resemble such a tree, usually made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC).
The tree was traditionally decorated with edibles such as apples, nuts or dates. In the https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/the-… Let these short Christmas stories, with the simplicity and purity of freshly fallen snow, transport you to a place of magic and joy. Think of the sweetness of cinnamon and candy canes, bright sparkly colours and the excitement of knowing Santa is on his way. These stories will awaken the joy and excitement of Christmas in every generation. Watch your children’s eyes light up and feel the warmth of Christmas spirit in your heart as you tell them captivating stories in Santa’s own words. You will treasure these 25 modern classic tales forever. Make every advent evening a special time of joy and togetherness with a wonderful Christmas bedtime story!

The most commonly used species are fir (Abies), which have the benefit of not shedding their needles when they dry out, as well as retaining good foliage colour and scent; but species in other genera are also used.

In northern Europe most commonly used are:

In North AmericaCentral America and South America most commonly used are:

Several other species are used to a lesser extent. Less-traditional conifers are sometimes used, such as Giant SequoiaLeyland CypressMonterey Cypress andEastern Juniper. Various types of spruce tree are also used for Christmas trees (including the Blue Spruce and, less commonly, the White Spruce); but spruces (unlike firs) begin to lose their needles rapidly upon being cut, and spruce needles are often sharp, making decorating uncomfortable. Virginia Pine is still available on some tree farms in the southeastern United States, however its winter colour is faded. The long-needled Eastern White Pine is also used there, though it is an unpopular Christmas tree in most parts of the country, owing also to its faded winter coloration and limp branches, making decorating difficult with all but the lightest ornaments. Norfolk Island Pine is sometimes used, particularly in Oceania, and in Australia, some species of the genera Casuarina and Allocasuarina are also occasionally used as Christmas trees. But, by far, the most common tree is the Monterey PineAdenanthos sericeus or Albany Woolly Bush is commonly sold in southern Australia as a potted living Christmas tree. Hemlock species are generally considered unsuitable as Christmas trees due to their poor needle retention and inability to support the weight of lights and ornaments.

Some trees, frequently referred to as “living Christmas trees”, are sold live with roots and soil, often from a plant nursery, to be stored at nurseries in planters or planted later outdoors and enjoyed (and often decorated) for years or decades. Others are produced in a container and sometimes as topiary for a porch or patio. However, when done improperly, the combination of root loss caused by digging, and the indoor environment of high temperature and low humidity is very detrimental to the tree’s health; additionally, the warmth of an indoor climate will bring the tree out of its natural winter dormancy, leaving it little protection when put back outside into a cold outdoor climate. Often Christmas trees are a large attraction for living animals, including mice and spiders. Thus, the survival rate of these trees is low.[55]However when done properly, replanting provides higher survival rates.[56]

European tradition prefers the open aspect of naturally grown, unsheared trees, while in North America (outside western areas where trees are often wild-harvested on public lands)[57] there is a preference for close-sheared trees with denser foliage, but less space to hang decorations.

In the past, Christmas trees were often harvested from wild forests, but now almost all are commercially grown on tree farms. Almost all Christmas trees in the United States are grown on Christmas tree farms where they are cut after about ten years of growth and new trees planted. According to the United States Department of Agriculture‘s agriculture census for 2007, 21,537 farms were producing conifers for the cut Christmas tree market in America, 5,717.09 square kilometres (1,412,724 acres) were planted in Christmas trees.[58]

The life cycle of a Christmas tree from the seed to a 2-metre (7 ft) tree takes, depending on species and treatment in cultivation, between 8 and 12 years. First, the seed is extracted from cones harvested from older trees. These seeds are then usually grown in nurseries and then sold to Christmas tree farms at an age of 3–4 years. The remaining development of the tree greatly depends on the climate, soil quality, as well as the cultivation and how the trees are tended by the Christmas tree farmer.[59]

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